The Speaker Spotter – March 3rd, 2016

Some interesting stuff on Craigslist in this week’s The Speaker Spotter, a curated selection of Seattle’s local speakers for sale online. As always, Retrovoltage is not affiliated with any of these sellers and you should click through the link to the original post if you’re interested. If a link is dead, most likely those speakers are gone!

Vintage JBL L55 Speakers
$250 in Burien, WA

Just south of Seattle, this pair of vintage JBLs have some cosmetic damage to the cabinets but look to have intact drivers, and will for sure have that vintage JBL sound you can’t find anywhere else. As far as the condition, well…speakers are meant for listening, not watching, anyway!

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Bose 901 Speakers
$325 in North Kenmore

This looks to be a solid deal for a set of Bose 901 speakers, which come with their original equalizer and paperwork. They seem to be in decent cosmetic shape, although with an equalizer that old it probably could use a once-over for the best sound. Series I and II have cloth surrounds, so there are almost never driver issues with these older pairs, too.

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Tannoy DC-200 Dual Concentric Speakers
$425 in Lake Stevens, WA

It’s a bit of a drive, but if you’re a fan of Tannoy it might be worth it to check out these DC-200 Dual Concentric Speakers. Their current owner reports he’s their second and they’re in good condition. I’m not very familiar with Tannoy speakers, other than having heard the name a bit, but they seem to use concentric/coaxial drivers like KEF and some older EV speakers. Looks worth checking out!

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KEF Q65 Tower Speakers
$250 in Olympia

While we’re talking about concentric drivers, here’s a KEF Q65 with a 6×9″ bass driver and concentric mid/tweeter, UK built and ready for bi-amping if desired. They look to have a decent frequency response, 38 Hz – 20 kHz at 91 dB sensitivity. I’m always a fan of strangely-shaped drivers, too.

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Phase Research Transmission Line Prototype Speakers
$140 in Everett, WA

These look interesting, and worth including, since I’m a sucker for anything that’s a one-off, prototype, or just a generally-unloved speaker from the ’70s. These are from 1978 and feature an interesting driver array and transmission line cabinet with rear opening. I wonder how they sound!

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Totem Acoustic Hawk Speakers
$1600 in Olympia

Speaking of transmission lines, if you’re in the market for something a bit higher-budget, these might be a good choice. They look like they’d be a great speaker if you’re looking for something that delivers tight sound, while still having a nice “furniture” look and likely wife-acceptance-factor. Spendy, though!

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ESS Tempest B2 Speakers
$350 in Everett

ESS was and is famous for their “air motion transformer” (AMT) tweeters which are a very interesting electrostatic hybrid design. Plenty about them written elsewhere, but if you’re looking for that kind of speaker in a large bookshelf form factor, this one’s for you.

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Dali Helicon 300 Home Stereo Speakers
$1995 in Tacoma, WA

These boutique-brand speakers feature a 6.5″ woofer, and both silk dome and ribbon tweeters. I bet they’re fantastically accurate while still being smooth in the high end. Great looking finish on these, too. I’d love to give them a listen!

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Carver Loudspeakers
$2000 in Redmond, WA

Haven’t seen enough ribbons and planar tweeters yet? Or maybe your speakers have a small surface area and you’re craving wide open spaces? These gigantic Carver electrostatic planar speakers might be what you need. They look to have two active elements, upgraded ribbons, and each appears to be about the size of your average door. I’ve never heard these myself, but Carver has a great reputation for amps, of which this seller also has many.

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